Sunday, October 5, 2008

An Amusement (II)

A Doubtful Egg is now on holidays and is going abroad. I can't imagine that, in between sightseeing, stuffing my face, and lounging about like a mottled slug, I'll have any time to get to a computer, so I won't be posting for a week or two. Feel free to root around in the archive and, if you like or dislike anything therein, please leave a comment. In the meantime, here's something interesting:

6 comments:

Sean Jeating said...

Is it because you posted this on Master Flann's birthday, or why would I've felt reminded of Sweeney when the Pook appeared on the tree? :)
Great stuff! I could not resist both to immediately and shamelessly pinch it.
Thanks for sharing.

Claudia said...

Good for a chuckle...

A Doubtful Egg said...

Sean: This is a astonishing example of serendipity in action: I genuinely didn't realise it was the great man's birthday when I posted this! I think both O'Brien and Burroughs would have got a real kick out of that...
It's also interesting that both Celtic culture and Mayan culture have a supernatural figure with such a similar name (although the Mayan 'Ah Puch', a Death God, is a more fearsome and malevolent spirit than the Irish Pooka).

Claudia: Thanks for the comment, and I hope you find more to amuse you here...

Claudia said...

I wasn't just amused...I didn't miss the profundity but enjoyed the original presentation. Thank you for your invitation to return.

Have a good holiday.

A Doubtful Egg said...

On the subject of amusement, HP Lovecraft once wrote: “Certainly, life can have no greater gift than emotional contentment during the aimless years from nothingness to nothingness again! However – this is not to imply that acquiring contentment is an easy or frivolous matter. Only the psychology of Victorian illusion and hypocrisy tries to invest trivial and meaningless things with the insipid glamour of a pretended jollity and happiness… [It is] futile … to expect anything to procure emotional satisfaction – or to pretend that it does – unless all the genuine laws of emotion and nerve-reaction are recognized and complied with. False or insincere amusement is the sort of activity which does not meet … real psychological demands … but merely affects to do so. Real amusement is the sort which is based on a knowledge of real needs, and which therefore hits the spot. This latter kind of amusement is what art is – and there is nothing more important in the universe.” (Selected Letters, 3.21; his emphasis)
Although I find many of Lovecraft's views repugnant, I think he was right on the money with the above.

Claudia said...

WOW! Lovecraft has never appealed to me, but I might have appealed to him...as the older I get, the more often I allow myself to be amused!

Looking forward to read more of your posts, Sir.